Cabeleireira norte-americana pinta cabelos inspirada em quadros famosos

O efeito é impressionante!

Uma cabeleireira que vive e trabalha no Kansas, Estados Unidos, está ganhando fama por transformar seu trabalho em arte. Ursula Goff fez uma série de tinturas em suas clientes inspiradas em ícones das artes plásticas  e publicou no Instagram. Em um dos posts, ela explica que aprendeu a tingir cabelos quando estava na faculdade mas que desde os 5 anos gosta de artes e pinta quadros e, assim, resolveu unir as duas paixões.  

O resultado ficou incrível, confira:

Cana Vermelha de Georgia O’Keeffe

 

Fine Art Series: Red Canna Lily, by Georgia O'Keeffe, who may be the female artist most people are familiar with. This painting is in the style she is most well known for: large close-ups of individual flowers. However, O'Keeffe herself didn't appreciate the interpretations given these works – most attributed Freudian theories (popular at the time), which of course meant that many assumed these to be representations of female genitalia. Second wave feminists even went so far as to consider O'Keeffe a pioneer of "female iconography", but O'Keefe continued to insist that she had simply painted flowers, and refused to work with feminist groups on any projects, feeling as though her own ideas had been co-opted by other agendas. This encouraged a change in subject matter for her, although she still painted in a characteristic style, using oils but conveying a soft, blended feel more reminiscent of water colors. This change did not harm her career, and she continued to be held in high regard and acquired a moderate amount of fame throughout the course of her life. I think her story brings forth interesting questions about the relationship between art and the viewer: does the artist alone get to control what their art is about? Or does the audience get to have a say? Do we have to accept outside interpretations for art, even if the artist disagrees with them? Is it fair to tell an artist what they may be "subconsciously" conveying? This is one of the fears of putting oneself out there artistically: that you will be misunderstood, misrepresented, and perhaps even rejected – understood or otherwise. O'Keeffe's situation, then, clearly demonstrates the vulnerability of being an artist. #art #painting #okeefe #georgiaokeeffe #redcanna #lilies #fineart #vulnerability #redhair #orangehair #yellowhair #flowers #modernsalon #behindthechair #fashionablygeek @nikkdawgg

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O Nascimento de Vênus de Boticelli

 

Fine Art Series: This is the famous "Birth of Venus", by Boticelli. This painting is enormous – 6 by 9 feet – and has some interesting history behind it. First off, it was painted in the early Renaissance period (1480's), and it's one of the first serious works ever done on canvas (in tempera, which is egg based paint), as wood panels had been the preferred surface before. More interestingly, it also depicts a fully nude woman who is NOT affiliated with Christianity, which was considered somewhat scandalous at the time. This was probably a reflection of the growing interest in humanism and the re-emergence of mythology in art at the time. However, Boticelli himself is said to have had a nervous breakdown due to his guilt in painting "pagan" works after a fanatical friar briefly gained power in Florence, Italy. The friar, named Savanarola, criticized and condemned "vanity" items like jewelry, books, mirrors, and frivolous art, and even had an event called "The Burning of the Vanities", where an enormous pile of such items was set on fire in the town square! How Boticelli's painting escaped its demise in this event is not known, but his work took a decidedly more spiritual, Christian turn afterwards. This brings to mind questions about censorship – what do you guys think? Should some art be censored? Is some art inappropriate? If so, who gets to decide, and what should be done with inappropriate art? How does this incident compare with more recent censorship situations? @sadiehutch2013 #art #Boticelli #venus #birthofvenus #greekmyths #greekmythology #renaissance #painting #tempera #bluehair #rainbowhair #unicornhair #mermaidhair #behindthechair #modernsalon

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Moça com Brinco de Pérola de Johannes Vermeer

 

Next in the Fine Art series is Girl With a Pearl Earring, by Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer. What is interesting about this color palette, along with many other Vermeer works, is his almost grandiose use of the blue tone (probably ultramarine), which was unusual at the time for artists, as it was a VERY expensive pigment, and Vermeer was not known to have made a lot of money in his lifetime. This pop of color against the warmer brown tones of the rest of the canvas give the painting a sense of newness, contrasted with the duller tones of most other paintings in the 17th century. It's also an excellent study in light and shadow, which Vermeer had an uncanny ability to recreate (it's been suggested that he may have had some help on that with camera obscuras or similar optics). If you want to see some of the earliest works of photorealism, look into some more of Vermeer's work, particularly "The Art of Painting" and "The Astronomer". #art #painting #vermeer #johannesvermeer #dutch #mermaidhair #unicornhair #rainbowhair #specialeffects #redken #redkenshades #behindthechair #modernsalon @bestcupcakemum

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A noite Estrelada de Vincent Van Gogh

 

Fine Art Series: I am sharing Van Gogh's "Starry Night" again for those who missed it, and also because I didn't originally publish any background on it. This is only one piece of a rather large body of work completed the last two years of Van Gogh's life, and Van Gogh himself was not impressed with it, never having any inkling that it would go on to become one of the most recognized pieces of art in Western history. He began it shortly after being admitted to the St. Rémy de Provence asylum, and it's largely composed of the view from his room, with the addition of a fictional village. Earlier in life, he had been very religious and had set out to become a pastor, but could never pass his exams and he struggled with his mental health continuously. He later abandoned religion, but still seemed to be searching for meaning and purpose, speculating that "hope is in the stars" – referencing the desire to experience an afterlife, perhaps in the stars or in another dimension. This desire stemmed from the fact that he had never been particularly happy, and suffered from depression, hallucinations, delusions, psychotic breaks, and a general inability to function, often trying to live and work on his own, but always failing, which would result in admittance to an asylum or going back to live with family or friends. He ultimately took his own life at age 37, dying from a self-inflicted gunshot wound that became infected. It could be argued that Van Gogh's mental illness fueled his creativity and made him a great artist, but even if that's true, his story is heartbreaking. It's hard for me to gauge if his enormous contributions to art were worth all the suffering this poor man endured. It's commonly believed, however, that suffering and art go hand in hand. What do you think? #art #fineart #vangogh #starrynight #starrynighthair #bluehair #yellowhair #postimpressionism #modernsalon #behindthechair

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O Grito de Edvard Munch

 

I often get asked where I went to hair school, and what sort of cosmetology education background I have. The answer is probably disappointing for most people – I went to a community college Cosmo program and have almost no other training outside of that. However, I have done art since I was 5, first developing hand skills as a sketcher, and then expanding those skills into color by working with acrylics, tempera, and especially water colors. I tend to color hair much the same way I color a canvas, using the same sorts of color application techniques and identical color theory. So in honor of my art background being so useful, I thought I'd do a Fine Art series, similar in concept to the Starry Night/hair presentation I recently did. Today, I'm sharing the work of Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. His work tends to fall under the Symbolism category, and this is his most well known painting, "The Scream", which has a bit of an unusual color palette, which I think contributes to the emotional discord of the image. I tend to very strongly agree with Munch's art philosophy: "I do not believe in the art which is not the compulsive result of Man's urge to open his heart." Many things I make simply because they are pretty, but my favorite pieces force themselves out of me in surges of emotional energy. Without art, I think I'd be far more dysfunctional, as I would struggle to express myself in other ways. @asset35 #painting #symbolism #edvardmunch #thescream #rainbowhair #mermaidhair #unicornhair #orangehair #bluehair #joico #specialeffects #pravana #behindthechair

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Fonte: COSMOPOLITAN EUA

 

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